Improving Customer Satisfaction: Changes as a Result of Customer Value Discovery

Susan McKnight, Mike Berrington

Abstract


Objective: To identify how interventions, as a result of Customer Value Discovery research, increased student satisfaction in an academic library. The process created a positive environment for ongoing innovation amongst staff to deliver added value to customers.
Methods: “Customer Discovery Workshops” were undertaken with academic staff and undergraduate on-campus students to provide managers and library staff with information on what services and resources were of value to customers, and what irritated them about existing services and resources. The impact of interventions was assessed two years after the research by using a university student satisfaction survey and an independent national student satisfaction survey.
Results: The findings resulted in significant changes to the way forward-facing customer services were delivered. A number of value adding services were introduced for the customer. Overall customer satisfaction was improved.
Conclusions: The customer value discovery research has created a culture of innovation and continuous improvement. The Balanced Scorecard framework was introduced to help track activity and performance against the objectives identified in the customer value research.

Keywords


customer satisfaction, customer value and irritations, library customer research, customer services, information services

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