Remembering and Forgetting Winnipeg: Making History on the Strike of 1919

Trevor Stace

Abstract


This article examines the approaches that historians, beginning in the mid 20th century and into the early 21st century, used to write about the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919. It focuses on five major works: The Winnipeg General Strike by D.C. Masters; Confrontation at Winnipeg by David J. Bercuson; The Workers' Revolt in Canada, 1917-1925 edited by Craig Heron; and When the State Trembled: How A.J. Andrews and the Citizens' Committee Broke the Winnipeg General Strike by Tom Mitchell and Reinhold Kramer. It identifies where the monographs depart from one another in interpretation; as well as where they remain the same. Given the layers of complexity, the interpretation of the event becomes especially salient in the 21st century as its 100th anniversary steadfastly approaches and the question of how should it be publicly presented in 2019 requires an answer soon (which the paper also addresses)


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